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Table 6 Employment effects of minimum wages on male and female workers in small firms

From: Do minimum wages affect employment? Evidence from the manufacturing sector in Indonesia

  Dependent variable:
  Log of Employment of Production Workers Log of Employment of Non-Production Workers
  Male Female Male Female
Log (Min. Wage) −0.0258 −0.0208 −0.058** −0.0430 −0.0365 −0.0290 −0.061*** −0.0692**
  (0.0174) (0.0210) (0.0245) (0.0309) (0.0236) (0.0289) (0.0227) (0.0287)
Log (Firm Age)   0.1202***   0.0964***   0.1003***   0.0802***
   (0.0081)   (0.0122)   (0.0110)   (0.0108)
Foreign Share   0.0007**   0.0001   0.0019***   0.0013***
   (0.0003)   (0.0006)   (0.0005)   (0.0004)
Export Share   0.0003***   0.0007***   0.0004**   0.0005***
   (0.0001)   (0.0001)   (0.0001)   (0.0001)
Govt. Share   0.0001   −0.0005**   0.0009***   −0.0000
   (0.0002)   (0.0003)   (0.0003)   (0.0002)
Firm Fixed Effects Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Year Effects Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Observations 167,873 113,780 126,026 83,780 159,346 106,834 129,736 85,473
Number of Firms 27,500 25,894 23,351 21,616 27,122 25,282 23,897 21,890
R-squared 0.8450 0.8498 0.8522 0.8591 0.8086 0.8104 0.7678 0.7708
  1. Notes: The sample includes only small firms with non-zero production and non-production workers, small firms that continuously observed from year to year, and small firms observed more than once during the sample period. Small firms are firms which always have 150 or fewer workers. Both paid and unpaid workers are included as data since 2001 do not permit separation of paid and unpaid workers by gender. The additional regressors have missing values in 2001, 2002, 2003, and 2005. Robust standard errors clustered by firm are reported in parentheses. ***p < 0.01, **p < 0.05, *p < 0.1